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The latest issue of The Classical Magazine is nominally The Books Issue, but our writers experienced a bit of that good old American Mission Creep. So you’ll find thoughts about magazine journalism, punk rock, philosophy, occult bike zines, three pieces of fiction (one of which brings together Dwayne Schintzius and Moby-Dick, at last), and more straight-ahead essays on the sports books that moved our contributors, from a classic portrait of gritty ’70s football, to literary novels about soccer managers that strive to reconcile the personal with the ideological. The common thread through it all is, as always, sporps.
We have a great cast of contributors, some Classical vets and some new bylines. The crew this time out is Paul Flannery, Alex Belth, Holly M. Wendt, Nathan Huffstutter, Damon Agnos, Meredith Craig de Pietro, Inman Majors, Bryan Joiner, Chris Collision, and Tobias Carroll.
They’re tackling North Dallas Forty the novel, the making of “What Do You Think of Ted Williams Now?,” doomed love and hockey, Harry Crews, The Pogues, “Waltzing Matilda,” Maurice Clarett, Robert Swift, Matt Bush, John Updike, and more. Do not take my word for the quality of this issue. Buy many copies and then make an informed decision yourself. As always, you can grab our magazine in single servings or subscriptions via our slick iOS app or our also-slick webstore for those who prefer to keep the ghost of Steve Jobs out of their isht. Sorry Steve! It’s all love!

The latest issue of The Classical Magazine is nominally The Books Issue, but our writers experienced a bit of that good old American Mission Creep. So you’ll find thoughts about magazine journalism, punk rock, philosophy, occult bike zines, three pieces of fiction (one of which brings together Dwayne Schintzius and Moby-Dick, at last), and more straight-ahead essays on the sports books that moved our contributors, from a classic portrait of gritty ’70s football, to literary novels about soccer managers that strive to reconcile the personal with the ideological. The common thread through it all is, as always, sporps.

We have a great cast of contributors, some Classical vets and some new bylines. The crew this time out is Paul Flannery, Alex Belth, Holly M. Wendt, Nathan Huffstutter, Damon Agnos, Meredith Craig de Pietro, Inman Majors, Bryan Joiner, Chris Collision, and Tobias Carroll.

They’re tackling North Dallas Forty the novel, the making of “What Do You Think of Ted Williams Now?,” doomed love and hockey, Harry Crews, The Pogues, “Waltzing Matilda,” Maurice Clarett, Robert Swift, Matt Bush, John Updike, and more. Do not take my word for the quality of this issue. Buy many copies and then make an informed decision yourself. As always, you can grab our magazine in single servings or subscriptions via our slick iOS app or our also-slick webstore for those who prefer to keep the ghost of Steve Jobs out of their isht. Sorry Steve! It’s all love!


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For a sports magazine we sure do name a lot of things after punk music tropes. Our government name comes from a Fall song, and the name of this issue (which is technically our second October issue) comes from a tossed-off philosophy patented by Mike Watt of the Minutemen.
The goal for issue #6 of The Classical was short, fast, loud pieces. We aimed for 500 words, but we didn’t actually hold anyone to that rule. 26 poems, memoirs, histories, fantasies, fictions, non-fictions, prayers, confessions roughly related to sports are inside the latest number of the mag, in the hope of demonstrating that length and depth are different things. And if it sucks, at least it was short (it does not suck). 
Here’s the list of contributors for #6: John Wesley Horton, Edith Zimmerman, David Roth, Reeves Wiedeman, Kyle Beachy, William Camponovo, Eric Nusbaum, Patrick Redford, Holly M. Wendt, Fredorrarci, Steve Weddle, John Schulian, Adam Doster, Brian Blickenstaff, Matt Kelsey, Alex Hagen, Emma Carmichael, Bryan Joiner, Pete Segall, Pete Beatty, C. Lee Tressel, Elliott Turner, Tom Ley, Chris Collision, Ted Walker, and Tomas Rios. Dang that is a fine list of contributors.
As always, you can subscribe or cop individual issues via the awesome 29th Street-powered app for Apple iOS. You can get PDF, Kindle, or ePub formats by contacting yrs truly at ptbeatty at gmail dot com. Subs are $29.99 for twelve issues, and individual issues are $3.99 a pop.

For a sports magazine we sure do name a lot of things after punk music tropes. Our government name comes from a Fall song, and the name of this issue (which is technically our second October issue) comes from a tossed-off philosophy patented by Mike Watt of the Minutemen.

The goal for issue #6 of The Classical was short, fast, loud pieces. We aimed for 500 words, but we didn’t actually hold anyone to that rule. 26 poems, memoirs, histories, fantasies, fictions, non-fictions, prayers, confessions roughly related to sports are inside the latest number of the mag, in the hope of demonstrating that length and depth are different things. And if it sucks, at least it was short (it does not suck). 

Here’s the list of contributors for #6: John Wesley Horton, Edith Zimmerman, David Roth, Reeves Wiedeman, Kyle Beachy, William Camponovo, Eric Nusbaum, Patrick Redford, Holly M. Wendt, Fredorrarci, Steve Weddle, John Schulian, Adam Doster, Brian Blickenstaff, Matt Kelsey, Alex Hagen, Emma Carmichael, Bryan Joiner, Pete Segall, Pete Beatty, C. Lee Tressel, Elliott Turner, Tom Ley, Chris Collision, Ted Walker, and Tomas Rios. Dang that is a fine list of contributors.

As always, you can subscribe or cop individual issues via the awesome 29th Street-powered app for Apple iOS. You can get PDF, Kindle, or ePub formats by contacting yrs truly at ptbeatty at gmail dot com. Subs are $29.99 for twelve issues, and individual issues are $3.99 a pop.


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Gangster, Prankster
Words by Damon Agnos, art by J.O. Applegate

Gangster, Prankster

Words by Damon Agnos, art by J.O. Applegate


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new issue (cover art by the mighty flipflopflyball)

new issue (cover art by the mighty flipflopflyball)


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Hockey Night in Chicago. Words and art by Dmitry Samarov.

Hockey Night in Chicago. Words and art by Dmitry Samarov.


To the Future: Introducing The Classical Magazine

The Classical is 18 months old, depending on when you start counting. We just got done being babies. We’re toddling now, warily eying the prospect of potty-training, getting ready to upgrade these gross motor skills for some fine motor skills. But, if you’ll pardon the toddlerbrag, we think we’re pretty accomplished for babies. Just in the past few weeks, this toddler had an awesome reported piece about Filipino hoops in the Yukon, a must-read on what came out of the closet with Jason Collins, and more installments in the rad, ongoing Why We Watch feature. But, as is generally the case among our toddler peer group, we’re just getting the hang of solving puzzles.

The puzzle weighing heaviest on our comically oversized 18-month-old heads right now is sustainability: How do we find a way to make The Classical economically just, not just for ourselves, but for our writers? As most of the people reading this will remember, we Kickstarted this site. The $55,000 that 1,070 of you gave to us—the generosity of which still amazes us and fills us to overflowing with gratitude—helped get us this far. We built a site, we paid our taxes, we paid server bills, all thanks to you, with an assist to Kickstarter.

But we need to find a way to turn “kickstarting” into a steady, always-on mode if we’re going to be able to keep this going. To that end, we’re going to do something old-fashioned: 1) create a product (the great and unique sportswriting we deliver on this site) 2) sell it for money. We’ve partnered with 29th Street Publishing—the awesome, nice geniuses who brought you the Awl’s Weekend Companion, Maura Magazine, V as in Victor and many more great publications—to create a magazine.

The Classical’s new magazine format will be for sale, via monthly or yearly subscriptions, as well as single-issue purchases, on the Apple iOS newstand. It’ll be $2.99 if you pay monthly, $29.99 if you sign up for a year in advance, and $3.99 to buy individual issues. (We’ll have a link to share early next week, and will share it then.) On the second Tuesday of every month, a new issue will appear to delight your senses (mostly/only your eyes) and give you 100% of your recommended daily allowance of adjectives. We’ll have a PDF option for Applephobes, too, and 29th Street is working hard to make a platform-agnostic version you can get on your Kindle, Dick Tracy watch, whatever. This is just for starters, by the way: the bigger the response, the more frequently we’ll be able to put these issues out, and the more readily we’ll be able to expand in other directions. We’re still growing, and aren’t trying to toddle forever.

If you are naturally inclined to first consider the gloomy side of life, as some of us are, you might be wondering “But so this means no more Classical website, huh?” To answer that: no, this is not the end of that. Will we maintain our present volume of 10 features a week plus Clog posts? Almost certainly not, because it is just an unbelievably immense amount of work given the number of people we have doing it, and because we also have other jobs that we need in order to pay rent, buy food, etc. But you can bank on something new on the site every day, although the magazine will have a supermajority of exclusive material (and some stuff from the website). Not only is this a way to get Classical-quality new reads on sports, but it’s a way to keep on top of things without checking in on the site everyday. We know you’re busy. We can tell this blog post is maybe already too long.

So we’ll let you get back to work/Dwarf Fortress/crafts therapy/your nap. But yes: this is what’s happening with us. We are very happy, and very proud, about The Classical magazine. This is the next step for us, and we hope you like it—we think it’s pretty awesome, ourselves, although we’re obviously somewhat biased. Most importantly, it’s a way for us to keep doing this thing. Stick with us. In every meaningful sense, we wouldn’t be here without you, and it will be fun to take this next step, together. And if you have any questions, ask us over email or on Twitter or Facebook or in the comments.


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29pco:

“Coming Soon”
The Classical “Boneless Filets”

OH WORD[?]

29pco:

“Coming Soon”

The Classical “Boneless Filets”

OH WORD[?]


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so, this is happening.

so, this is happening.


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star wars day at sox park, dmitry samarov

star wars day at sox park, dmitry samarov